Top Canadian Players in the NFL (Retired and Playing)

 

The NFL is one of Canada’s most popular sports, and the league’s history is full of Canadian players. As known already, Canadians are highly talented in various sports, which is why they excel in many sports.

 

Among the great football players in the history of Canada, we selected these few retired and currently playing stars of the NFL. They have all influenced the sport and NFL lines and achieved success at different levels.

 

Randy Chevrier

Born in Montreal, Chevrier played in the Canadian Football League and the National Football League. The product of McGill University, Redmen, the long-snap specialist, was drafted in the seventh round by the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2001. He also won the JP Metras Trophy, given to the top college lineman in Canada, in 2000.

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Louis-Philippe Ladouceur

Nicknamed “L.P.” by Americans, Ladouceur is a long snapper who currently plays for one of the most decorated franchises in professional football history. In addition to being perfect on all his throwbacks since the beginning of his career, Ladouceur did not miss a game since 2005. To reward his work, the Dallas Cowboys granted him a new five-year contract in February 2013.

 

Jean-Philippe Darche

Darche was one of the first Quebecers to settle full-time in the NFL. First drafted by the Toronto Argonauts after a successful stint with the McGill Redmen, Darche broke into the Seattle Seahawks roster as a long snap specialist in 2000. He played 97 games in seven seasons in Seattle before joining and being released by the team. An injury ended his career in 2008 while playing for the Kansas City Chiefs.

 

Pierre Vercheval

Although he failed to make his mark in the NFL, Vercheval is one of the great linemen in Canadian football history. He was a six-time CFL All-Star in addition to winning the title of Top Lineman in 2000. After a career spanning 14 seasons, Vercheval became a television analyst, and Canadian football fans highly appreciate his insightful comments.

 

Tom Nutten

Born in Germany but raised in Lennoxville, Nutten is among the few Quebecers to have a Super Bowl ring. The former St. Louis Rams offensive guard played 69 games with the team between 1998 and 2005. He was one of quarterback Kurt Warner’s protectors when they won the Super Bowl in 1999.

 

Tim Biakabutuka

He is probably the most talented Canadian player in history. Born in Zaire but raised in Montreal, Biakabutuka still holds the record for most rushing yards in a season with the University of Michigan Wolverines. In a game against the Wolverines’ arch-rivals, the Ohio State University Buckeyes, Biakabutuka rushed for 313 yards to help his team beat one of the best teams in the country.

 

Drafted in the 1st round by the Carolina Panthers in 1996, the running back did not meet expectations due to injuries. He played only 50 games in six seasons but still amassed 3,319 yards from the line of scrimmage and scored 17 touchdowns.

 

DB Tevaughn Campbell

The Scarborough, Ontario native DB Tevaughn Campbell made over 30 tackles and established new career-highs in almost all statistical NFL match categories during his first season with the L.A. Rams.

It’s one of the feats that made him one of the top Canadian players in the NFL.

According to some football stats platforms like Pro Football Focus, Campbell ranked 92nd among NFL cornerbacks, having a 56.9 grade. While not elite, the Canadian star grade was better than Vernon Hargreaves III and Asante Samuel Jr.

 

DL Christian Covington

The last on our list is Christain Covington. He is the son of the Canadian Football League legendβ€”Grover Covington. He had an impressive 2021 season making three tackles and 52 total tackles. He might not be the classiest NFL Canadian player, but he certainly knows his game.

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Conclusion

The players mentioned in this list are just a few of the top Canadian talents that have graced the NFL and CFL. Which player do you think we missed? We would love to have your opinion.

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